Starting on January 1st and going until October 28th of 2015 I went bowling every day in an attempt to achieve a perfect game. Each channel of video represents an accumulation of myself bowling for a month. To give a brief summary in the rules of bowling, a perfect game is achieved by scoring a strike (all the pins fall down) in every frame. This equates to twelve possible strikes occurring in a row equaling a score of 300 points for a perfect game with all the point multipliers that occur in placing strikes back to back for the full game. I gave myself 300 days to achieve 300 points in a single game. This would be the first time in my life I would have been able to truly obtain perfection. 

8 Minute Excerpt From

Perfectus Propter Imperfectionem (Perfection Depends on Incompleteness)

10 Channel Video, Running Time: 8 Hours 36 Minutes

Perfectus Propter Imperfectionem (Perfection Depends on Incompleteness)

“A concept with so many application(s) as perfection, involves many questions. The most general are: is perfection knowable? Is it attainable? And, is it necessary? The first is a propos especially in metaphysics, the second in ethics, the third in aesthetics. And everywhere one should ask: how are we to understand perfection, in order that we may understand it…most perfectly?”
-Wladyslaw Tatarkiewicz, Polish Philosopher

We tell ourselves that perfection is meaningless, or unobtainable, and yet we strive for it regardless. But why is it that we feel inadequate when things don’t go perfectly? Is this due to hope giving us a false confidence? Is it the pressure placed on us by others to keep performing?
Society gives us the idea that perfection can be obtainable by the individual. If perfection is found out to be unobtainable then the fabric of society breaks down because hope is lost.
Hope gives us the idea that we can achieve anything if we continue to work towards it, there is this notion inside all of us that hard work and dedication pays off. That practice makes perfect. But what if you don’t get the results you expected? Is this failure? Sure, it’s the very definition, but then why is failure seen as such a negative? Is it due to the culture that surrounds us? Is it possible that we all have something inside of us telling us that we can always be better?

By repeatedly attempting to reach perfection, could we in return be breaking down over time? The Paradox of Perfection tests these ideas and ultimately asks: can your failures become your success? Or is it up to us to decide the definition of failure and success?

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument

300 Bowling Scores, Pedestal, Shelf of Bowling Trophies

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument

If There is No Document, We Cannot Build Our Monument / The King And The Pawns

The King And The Pawns

There is an old Italian proverb that states "At the end of the game, the king and the pawns return to the same box"

The King And The Pawns

There is an old Italian proverb that states "At the end of the game, the king and the pawns return to the same box"

The King And The Pawns

There is an old Italian proverb that states "At the end of the game, the king and the pawns return to the same box"

Bowling The Perfect Game

Video, Running Time 56 Minutes, 1991, ABC Sports Home Video

Bowling The Perfect Game

Video, Running Time 56 Minutes, 1991, ABC Sports Home Video

5 Minute excerpt from Bowling The Perfect Game

Video, Running Time 56 Minutes, 1991, ABC Sports Home Video

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